Stig

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About Stig

Stig holds a master’s degree in Finance, has studied Business Analysis at Harvard University, and he’s the co-founder of the educational stock investing site The Investors Podcast. Before Stig took up stock investing he came from a career in one of Europe’s leading energy trading companies. Now, Stig works as a college professor teaching a variety of courses including financial accounting, investment and economics. Stig also owns the investment company Stig Brodersen Holding. Stig’s the author of The Warren Buffett Accounting Book, The 100 Page Summary of The Intelligent Investor, and The 100 Page Summary of Security Analysis.

VALUE INVESTING VS. MOMENTUM INVESTING

by Stig Brodersen | 15 October 2015

Although I'm a huge value investor, I stretch my comfort level and talk to Jack Vogel about his hybrid investing approach. Jack is a "quant" investor that uses decades of back testing to try new strategies that combine value and momentum investing.

Measuring Portfolio Performance: The Sharp Ratio and Sortino Ratio for Value Investors

by Stig Brodersen | 1 October 2015

How do you measure the performance of your portfolio? Warren Buffett simply looks at the change in his net income and the change in his equity from year to year. Others use a thing called the Sharp Ratio. In this article, Stig talks to investing expert Wesley Gray.

How to play the oil rebound in 2016

by Stig Brodersen | 26 September 2015

With oil prices sinking deeper by the day, is it a good time to enter the market? Stig talks with oil expert, Morgan Downey, to discuss the risks and oppertunities.

I love the Efficient Market Hypothesis – and you should too!

by Stig Brodersen | 4 September 2015

As a professor of finance, many might assume Stig is a natural lover of the Efficient Market Hypothesis (EMH). Although he might love the theory, it's not for the reasons most professors might think.

Is the stock market unbeatable?

by Stig Brodersen | 1 September 2015

Why does everyone you meet in academia tell you that the stock market can't be beat. More importantly, why do more than 90% of mutual funds underperform the S&P 500? In this article Stig explains.